Far, Far Away…

Far, Far Away Soria Moria Palace Glittered like Gold, Theodor Kittelsen, 1900.

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The Duluth Pack – The First Patented Backpack…

(from the Paleotool vault)

I just had to reblog this fine article from 74 Footwear Design

“Camille Poirier patented the first back pack on Dec. 12, 1882 in Duluth, Minnesota (Patent No. 268,932). Initially called the Pack-Strap the pack is today referred to as the Duluth Pack.

The basic design of the Duluth Pack already existed in the blanket bag, or knapsack and had been in use for at least 100 years by the British Army prior to the patent, especially during the American Revolution. But Camille Poirier added a few improvements including a sternum strap, tumpline and an umbrella strap to hold an umbrella, or sunshade above the users head while hiking.

With a budding wilderness recreation movement in the USA, the Duluth Pack designed for ease of use went onto arguably become the first world’s first recreational backpack.”

“Incredibly today and over 130 years since its patent, the Duluth Pack is still is available and being made in Duluth, Minnesota, USA.

Which new products of 2012 will still be made in 2142? And what will be the determining factors for their longevity?”

See the original article HERE: https://74fdc.wordpress.com/2012/12/26/the-duluth-pack-the-first-patented-backpack/

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A Nice Pack Basket

If you know me at all you know that I am interested in pack baskets.  Because of this, they catch my eye when I’m browsing historic images. 

I could find no information whatsoever about this one.  I suspect maybe Tibet in the early 20th century?  Pack baskets have been underrated in the west.  I’m glad to see more and more of them used in the primitive technology, bushcraft, and survival communities.  I love the one I made but I know there are even better ones out there.

I was interested in the harness system here.  It seems to sling around the entire basket for support.  It took me some time and effort to come up with one I liked for mine but based on some historic examples, I was able to come up with one that worked.

Enjoy a little preindustrial technology today.

How to Improvise and Use a Three Stick Roycroft Pack Frame

Thanks to Survival Sherpa for posting this look at making a pack frame.  Making a quick, three stick pack frame is a valuable bit of knowledge.  How serendipitous that this came up (seems to be a lot of convergent thinking around my world lately) as I am beginning to tweak my own wooden pack frame for some experimental travel.  And while we’re on the subject here’s a link to a broad look at pack frames from around the world on Markus Kittner’s fine web page.

Flyers-2

Have a look at Survival Sherpa by clicking the link below.

Source: How to Improvise and Use a Three Stick Roycroft Pack Frame

how-to-improvise-and-use-a-three-stick-roycroft-pack-frame-thesurvivalsherpa-com

Japanese Pack Frame

And an interesting basket.

Pack frames are nearly universal historically as most cultures encounter the drudgery of carrying heavy loads over long distances.  I am always searching for historic images to delve into to look for inspiration.  Here is a nifty pack frame from the early 20th century of a charcoal maker from Japan.  The frame looks like simple through-tenons in a rectangle.  The pack basket appears to be fairly simple twined straw and I think the shoulder straps are woven fiber.  He is also sporting some nifty looking waraji sandals.

japanesepackframeThis is what I could find out about the image:

RUSTIC OLD JAPAN — The Charcoal Carrier
From a Sample Set of Classic Meiji and Taisho-era Japan Stereoview images by Japanese Photographer T. ENAMI (1859-1929).

Photo by T. Enami, ca.1898-1905. View number S-392 from Enami’s 3-D Catalog.

See www.t-enami.org

Rucksack

I had a friend shoot a few pictures of the rucksack in action.  My only regret is that it could be slightly bigger.  But then again, I’d just fill it with more stuff.

Ruck4It should last a lifetime and beyond.

Ruck1Not exactly dressed up here.  I’m wearing the old caulking and painting shorts.

Ruck2If I remember correctly, the combined volume is about 2375 cubic inches (about 39 litres).

Ruck3

 

 

Woven Backpacks – Design Rooted in History and Tradition

Another reblog. Markus has done an excellent review of pack baskets here.

74 FOOTWEAR DESIGN CONSULTING

Its fair to say that my personal interest in woven Mexican Huarache footwear extends to everything woven. As far as I know despite all the technological advances in history, woven Huaraches just like woven baskets cannot be made by machine and have to be made by hand. In someways this makes basketry and Huarache weaving one of the highest forms of craft.

For more information on the craft of Mexican Huarache footwear please visit Huarache Blog.

Although basketry is one of the earliest forms of craft in the world, its unclear how long woven Basket Packs have existed for, but many old designs are still used in many countries around the world.

Some old paintings and prints help trace Basket Packs to 1400-1500’s.

BasketBosch1
Images via Wood Trekker: A Brief History of the Modern Backpack (Comments Section)

The Adirondack Pack Basket as it is known today is traditionally made…

View original post 453 more words

Varnish

The next step in finishing the pack frame…

Packframevarnished

Here’s a detailed photo of the naked frame with an initial coat of oil & pine-tar coating.  This will weatherproof the whole thing and make the rawhide less appealing to critters (I caught my dog licking one of the lashings this morning).  This mixture is about 60% boiled linseed oil and 40% Stockholm pine-tar, an ancient coating used on just about everything in pre-industrial northern Europe.  It should dry in a day or two and be ready for a second thin coat later in the week.

Field Testing

Image

DSC_0167Field testing the nearly finished rucksack.  It still needs a few closures and bits but is essentially as finished as anything I make.  It’s poorly packed for a quick hike and not very full.  More pictures to follow when I get some time off to tramp around with it.

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Features: Heavy, waxed canvas truck tarp with 10-12 oz leather straps and all brass hardware.  It has an axe sleeve, two long, exterior pockets, small flap pocket, two narrow pen-type sleeves, interior valuables pocket, compression D-rings on sides, D rings for shelter roll, and loops for carabiners.

DSC_0169

All hand saddle-stitched and riveted at stress points.  I’ll put up a sketch of the pattern for anyone interested.