Creating Every Day

Make something with your hands every day, some wisdom from Mahatma Gandhi.  It has been my goal for a long time now to follow this creed and it makes me happy nearly every day; even if it is something small, it is a small victory.

Its a tragedy of the first magnitude that millions of people have ceased to use their hands as hands. Nature has bestowed upon us this great gift which is our hands. If the craze for machinery methods continues, it is highly likely that a time will come when we shall be so incapacitated and weak that we shall begin to curse ourselves for having forgotten the use of the living machines given to us by God.”  ~ Mahatma Gandhi

Lest we forget what makes us human.

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Luigi Prina: A Fantasy Artist of Straight Out of My Dream World

I was thinking last night about a remarkable artist I first read about in The Blinking City, Luigi Prina.  I posted about him before but his work never ceases to amaze me.  Mr. Prina has been an architect for over 50 years but his model building is a real combination of inspired art and fantasy.  He’s been building flying models from paper and balsa wood since he was very young shows his amazing and artistic genius.

Luigi-Prina-Flying-Ships-Milan24

Many look like images from Leonardo DaVinci’s workshop and are beautiful to look at, much less to see fly.

Luigi-Prina-Flying-Ships-Milan13

Have a look at the article (I’ve reprinted some of the images below) and watch the short video of this remarkable Maker of dreams.  The Blinking City has a load of other great articles very worth reading.

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan
Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

vLuigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

Luigi Prina Flying Ships Milan

And click this link to see even more: Luigi Prina

The Beginner’s List

A good post by Wesley from Wesleyworkswithwood. I like lists. I enjoy seeing tool lists that people think of as essential. I used to like the packing lists for backpacking that the Boy Scouts printed. I like the lists that traveling Buddhist monks put out as part of their order. Lists pare us down to the bare bones and make us think about what we have, what we need, and what we want. Head over to Wesley’s and get in on the discussion. It should be a grand old time.

wesleyworkswithwood

My beginner’s tool list:

  • Workbench
  • Panel cross-cut saw
  • Two back saws, one rip, one cross-cut
  • Stanley No. 5 Jack plane, or non-Stanley equivalent
  • One 3/4″ chisel
  • One 1/4″ mortise chisel
  • A Mallet
  • Two holdfasts
  • Two to four wooden handscrew clamps
  • Two to four 4 foot long bar clamps
  • One pint wood glue
  • Cut nails, 1″ long
  • Cut nails, 1 1/4″ long
  • Flat head screws, 1 1/4″
  • Sandpaper in grits 100, 160, 180, 220
  • Sharpening stones in rough, medium, and fine grits
  • Knock off of an eclipse sharpening jig
  • 12″ Combination Square
  • Marking Gauge
  • Marking Knife
  • 24″ Straightedge
  • Tape measure
  • 16 oz claw hammer
  • Set of screwdrivers
  • Drill with common bits in common sizes

This post got away from me. Here’s what I hope to get out of it: a conversation. Do you think someone could get started with what I’ve listed above? Can something be removed from that list?

I…

View original post 1,293 more words

Project: Buckskin Bags

To aid in downsizing our worldly possessions (and tons of raw materials), I initiated the buckskin bag project.  The goal is to produce as many little beauties as possible while experimenting and learning new techniques.

This is the first run of bags, which still require embellishments, closures, and neck straps.  More to come…

Luigi Prina: The Ships That Sail Through the Clouds

A story of a remarkable artist from The Blinking City.

Luigi-Prina-Flying-Ships-Milan5

Mr. Prina has been an architect for over 50 years but his model building is a work of art and fantasy.  Building flying models from paper and balsa wood since he was very young shows his amazing and artistic genius.

Luigi-Prina-Flying-Ships-Milan24

Many look like images from Leonardo DaVinci’s workshop and are beautiful to look at, much less to see fly.

Luigi-Prina-Flying-Ships-Milan13

Have a look at the article and watch the short video of this remarkable Maker of dreams.

More Woodworking Tools on the ‘net

Here’s some  images from a short eBook on woodworking by Peter C. Welsh.  A quick read with some good stuff in it.

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Not just eye candy, there is good information contained in this study of tools.  But really, I’m just in it for the tool porn.

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I particularly like the comparison of tools owned and used by actual people.  For instance, in a Virginia workshop of 1709:

“John Crost, a Virginian, owned, in addition to sundry shoemaking and agricultural implements, a dozen gimlets, chalklines, bung augers, a dozen turning tools and mortising chisels, several dozen planes (ogees, hollows and rounds, and plows), several augers, a pair of 2-foot rules, a spoke shave, lathing hammers, a lock saw, three files, compasses, paring chisels, a jointer’s hammer, three handsaws, filling axes, a broad axe, and two adzes.”

A man could get a lot done with that tool kit.

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In 1827, a Middleborough, Massachusetts, a carpenter lists his tools and their value.  This is likely a representative set of tools for an actual tradesman of the time.

1 set bench planes $6.00
1 Broad Axe 3.00
1 Adze 2.25
1 Panel saw 1.50
1 Panel saw 1.58
1 fine do— 1.58
1 Drawing knife .46
1 Trying square .93
1 Shingling hatchet .50
1 Hammer .50
1 Rabbet plane .83
1 Halving do .50
1 Backed fine saw 1.25
1 Inch augre .50
1 pr. dividers or compasses— .71
1 Panel saw for splitting 2.75
1 Tennon gauge 1.42
1 Bevel .84
1 Bradd Hammer .50
1 Architect Book 6.50
1 Case Mathematical Instruments 3.62-1⁄2
1 Panel saw 2.75
1 Grafting saw 1.00
1 Bench screw 1.00
1 Stamp 2.50
1 Double joint rule .62-1⁄2
1 Sash saw 1.12-1⁄2
1 Oil Can .17
1 Brace & 36 straw cold bits 9.00
1 Window Frame tool 4.00
1 Blind tool 1.33
1 Glue Kettle .62-1⁄2
1 Grindstone without crank 1.75
1 Machine for whetting saws .75
1 Tennoning machine 4.50
Drafting board and square Bevel— 1.25
1 Noseing sash plane with templets & copes 4.50
1 pr. clamps for clamping doors 2.17
1 Set Bench Planes—double irons.— 7.50
1 Grindstone 300 lbs @ 6.25
1 Stove for shop—$7.25, one elbow .37 & 40
lbs second hand pipe $4.00 11.62
1 Bed moulding 2.00
1 Pr. shears for cutting tin.— .17
1 Morticing Machine 10.75
1 Grecian Ovilo 1.13
1-3⁄16 beed .67
1 Spirit level 2.25
1 Oil stone .42
1 Small trying square .48
1 pareing chisel .37
1 Screw driver .29
1 Bench screw .75
1 Box rule .50
1-3⁄4 Augre .41
11 Gouges 1.19
13 Chisels 1.17
1 small iron vice .52
1 pr. Hollow Rounds .86
4 Framing chisels 1.05
1 Grove plough & Irons—Sold at 4.50 5.00
1 Sash plane for 1-1⁄4 stuff 1.50
1 Copeing plane .67
1 Bead 1⁄4— .75
1 Bead 3⁄4 1.00
1 Rabbet (Sold at .92) .92
1 Smooth plane 1.50
1 Strike Block .92
1 Compass saw .42
6 Gauges 1.83
1 Dust brush .25
1 Rasp, or wood file .25
1 Augre 2 in. .76
1 Augre 1 in. .40
1 Do 3⁄4 .30
1 Spoke shave .50
1 Bevel— .25
1 Box rule .84
1 Iron square 1.42
1 Box rule 1.25
1 Spur Rabbet (Sold—1.17) 1.33
1 Pannel plane 1.25
1 Sash plane 1.25
1 pr. Match planes 2.25
1 Two inch chisel or firmer— .42
1 Morticing chisel 3⁄8 .25
1 Large screw driver 1.00
1 Pr. small clamps .50
1 pr. Spring dividers .92
1 do-nippers .20
1 Morticing chisel 1⁄2 in. .28
1 Ovilo & Ostrigal 3⁄4— 1.25
1 Scotia & Ostrigal 5⁄8— 1.08
1 Noseing— 1.08
1 Pr. Hollow & rounds 1.33
1 Ogee— 1⁄2 inch 1.00
1 Ostrigal 7⁄8 inch 1.00
1 Bit— .15
1 Beed 1⁄2 inch .83
1 Claw hammer .67
1 Fillister 2.50
2 Beeds at 5⁄8 1.83
1 Pair Quirk tools 1.50
1 Side Rabbet plane .83
1 Large steel tongued sq. 1.71
1 Saw & Pad .67
1 pr. fire stones .50
1 small trying sq. .50
1 Set Bench planes double ironed without smooth plane 6.00
1 Bench screw .75
 

from “A Yankee Carpenter and His Tools,” The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association (July 1953), vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 33–34.

I could ponder this list for a long time and find only a few things to add from our modern arsenal of gadgets and labor-savers.

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Overall, Welsh does a decent job of outlining the changes in woodworking tools over the last three centuries, and provides great period illustrations too.  Read the complete book for free HERE.

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