Build a New Sled in Time for Christmas!

With the holiday season just around the corner, it’s time to start making those gifts for friends and family.  I collect old plans for projects I never seem to get around to making but here’s a quickie that might be on the table soon.  Maybe you know some youngster that will need a sled this year.

finished sled

Or maybe it’s time to train the useless dog to help out around camp…

https://i0.wp.com/www.thewoodcrafter.net/proj/prpics/p44_3.jpg

There’s not much to it really but a good set of measurements is always welcome in a new project.  An old pallet and a couple long boards will just about do it.

And maybe, just maybe, one less plastic tub sled will end up in the landfill.  Here’s the link to the original article:

http://www.thewoodcrafter.net/proj/p44.php

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Another Early Bicycle

“Any Boy can learn himself to ride in a few hours…”

I am a fan of cycling and have a special place in my heart for the old contraptions from the early days.  Based on the enormous price, the one pictured below must have been a rich kid’s toy.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics $25 in 1869 is the equivalent of $432 today.

However, this model was a truly cutting-edge machine as it has pedals.  Pedals were added to the coasting “balance bicycle” in the 1860s taking this otherwise limited toy into the realm of a true form of transportation.  It’s good to note that the early “bone-shakers” were generally made of wood and were only made from metals sometime after 1870 as the technology became available.

From the March 1869 issue of Harper’s New Monthly magazine, found HERE.

Presented here are a few more gentlemen on velocipedes from an 1868 Harper’s Magazine for your viewing pleasure.

Finally, by the 1890s, bicycle sales were catering to women as well as men (and other children) and like the ad says, “Perfection Attained” in the Crescent Bicycle.

From the April 1895 issue of The Delineator.

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Growing Up on the Range…

(from the Paleotool vault)

Here’s a great story I read years ago about being raised in a family of six in a sheep camp measuring about 7 x 8′! (I think that’s the floor space).  I recently relocated the article in Mother Earth News.

Nice layout sketch of a sheep camp.

Here’s an excerpt:

“The canvas-covered sheep wagon was roughly about seven feet wide by eight feet long. On the front end a door opened out of the middle and you stepped down onto the wagon tongue and thence to the ground. From the inside looking out, the stove was on the left of the door. On the right was a small wash stand with several wooden drawers for storage of linens, towels and socks. A bucket of water and washbasin were on the oil cloth covered top and a small mirror hung above the basin for shaving. Soap, toothbrush, razor and essentials rested on top of the stand when in location or were stowed in a drawer when moving.”

Read more here: http://www.motherearthnews.com/nature-community/sheepherders-wagon-zmaz70mjzkin.aspx

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London Nomads

-John Thomson, London Nomads 1877.

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What on Earth is a Gymnacyclidium?

WHAT THE HELL IS A GYMNACYCLIDIUM YOU ASK?

(no, it’s not some mysterious bit of anatomy you should have learned about in health class!).

Gymnacyclidium

Now that’s quite a velocipede indeed!  Instead, I guess we all just decided that bicycle was easier to say.

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