A Carpenter’s Workshop

Someday, I'll have one this nice again... Click the image for a much larger version.

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Home Carpentry

As usual, an interesting old find posted on the Lost Arts Press. It’s worth a read.

“It is doubtless the timidity of woman which restrains her mending instincts. She dreads the saw and the chisel as treacherous tools that inevitably inflict wounds on the user… Moreover, she can never grasp the difference between a nail and a screw, and regards the latter as an absurd variety of nail which can not be driven with a hammer unless the wielder of the hammer has the muscles of a man.”

Lost Art Press

parrs_gentlemans_tool_chestThe woman who indulges in carpenter-work seldom does much harm. She contents herself with trying to drive nails into the wall, and with experiments with mucilage. She drives her nails with great caution, and when she has loosened an inch or two of plaster she becomes alarmed, and resolves to let her husband assume the responsibility of inflicting further injury on the wall.

She has a profound faith in the value of mucilage as a substitute for glue, and hopefully attempts to mend china and furniture with it; but mucilage is as harmless as it is inefficient, and it is only on the rare occasions when it is used to mend the wheels of the clock that it does any permanent injury to anything.

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Joining Techniques for Building Houses, Barns, etc.

A selection of simple construction framing joints for building construction. These are all really just mortises or forms of notching.  These simple techniques can add a lot of value to your repertoire.  The internet shows so much excitement when these things are seen in Japanese joinery but let's not forget that this technology was world-wide … Continue reading Joining Techniques for Building Houses, Barns, etc.

Låg arbeidsbenk på Sogn Folkemuseum

I think I may have found a portable bench design that works for me and the small bench top I’ve been saving. (Pardon the poor translation; it is a mix of Google translator and my best effort).

The Heiberg Collections – Sogn Folk Museum has a very rich collection of objects related to various crafts.  They have a beautiful display of carpenter’s tools that have been displayed to resemble a workshop with workbench and tools. In addition, they have much of this collection in the collection.  In this book I came across a workbench that woke my interest.  The bench has registration number DHS.3884. The bench is at a height so  to sit on, 46 cm high (18 inches) and about 1.5 meters (60 inches) long.  In one end there is a vise and the other end there is a screw clamp with crank.

I will start drawing up plans when I get a chance.

Høvelbenk

De Heibergske Samlinger – Sogn Folkemuseum har ei veldig rik samling av gjenstandar knytt til ulike handverk. Dei har ei flott utstilling av snikkarverktøy som er lagt til rette som ein verkstad med arbeidsbenkar og verktøy. I tillegg har dei mykje av samlinga si i gjenstandsmagasin. I dette magasinet kom eg over ein arbeidsbenk som vekte mi interesse. Benken har registreringsnummer DHS.3884.  Benken er i høgd slik at han er til å sitje på, 46 cm høg og ca 1,5 meter lang. I eine enden er det ei baktang og i andre enden er det ei skruklemme med sveiv.

Arbeidsbenken slik han står på magasinet på museet. Foto: Roald Renmælmo Arbeidsbenken slik han står på magasinet på museet. Foto: Roald Renmælmo

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The Status of the Apprentice

Lost Art Press

chandler_barber_advert

Let the boy learn a trade. Watch him at his work and at his play; study his likes and dislikes; place him in a position where he can exercise his talent— if he has any—or his creative genius. Place him where he can learn a trade for which he is best adapted, mentally and physically, and if in after years, he chooses to follow any other line of endeavor, business, law, polities, literature, the stage, the lecture platform, or whatever he considers himself best adapted for, he may do so.

Then should his efforts prove a failure he has always a trade to fall back upon which will at least give him a chance to earn more than the pay of a day laborer. This argument was much in vogue years ago, and we sometimes hear it today, but the obstacles placed in the way make it impossible of achievement…

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