Ghillie brogues (shoes)

I am all about the DIY.  After making a pair of sandals for Winter Count this year (I arrived with only work boots) I got re-interested in making shoes.  I have made many moccasins for woods walking, especially when I was into mountain man and F & I re-enactment and decided to make some new ghillies.  I like these because there is almost no sewing and I think they are cool.  Much of Europe wore a variation of this theme for millenia.  I then took it as a veritable sign when I saw this on the Instructables web page: http://www.instructables.com/id/Viking_shoes/.  Even though these are listed as Viking style, I think they are commonly associated with their Celtic cousins in Scotland, Wales, and Ireland.  And they are very nearly the same as Roman carbatina.  Essentially, a basic European shoe.

I made a set of these many years ago with a little instruction from an acquaintance and they were great.  These new ones are a little more thought out and I will likely make a better pair based on what I learned here.  Click photos for larger picture.

pattern and finished
pattern and finished
rear view
rear view
sewn heel
sewn heel
lacing the toe
lacing the toe
after wetting and shaping
after wetting and shaping
drying before oiling
drying before oiling

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2 thoughts on “Ghillie brogues (shoes)

  1. The Vikings are not Celtic and neither are the Celts Germanic, the two groups often fought, as the Nordic Vikings invaded Celtic Britain.
    The Thistle is the flower of Scotland came about as the flower of Scotland after the battle of Largs, where the Scots were notified of the Viking army by virtue of an advanced scouting party of the Vikings carelessly walking through a field of thistles, and their cries of pain alerting the Scots.

    1. Thanks Hal. Yes, I am familiar with these facts and I don’t think I stated anything to the contrary (I even did an Master’s degree on the Celts). I am familiar with the folktale of why we have the thistle as our emblem and I certainly am aware of Vikings and other Germanic peoples. If you are referring to the Instructable that I link, that isn’t mine, just one I thought was fairly useful and well done if not entirely historically accurate.

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