Making a Stitching Pony; Video Tutorial

Stitching Pony, Leather Worker’s Clamp, or Saddler’s Clam…

Whatever you call it, it is a handy device to own if you sew any leather.  These are simple devices that just about anyone can make with little time or money invested.  Although there are many varieties and models, the one shown in this tutorial by Harry Rogers of Bucklehurst Leather is the one I have most commonly seen.  Is there no end to this man’s skill and diversity of talents?

 

The only comments I really have are:

YES, the jaws should be lined with thick, smooth leather and that the gap is necessary to keep the jaws as flat as possible against the work.  It is also nice, but not necessary, to have a compression spring over the bolt to push the jaws apart when loosened.   And finally (terrible way to open a sentence in writing I know), a recent comment from a friend suggested that the tightening nut could be replaced and a better system be devised from a bicycle quick release axle.  Maybe on the next one.

Check out his leather work here:

bucklehurstleather_stamp_0fd2bd01-fcde-4de3-b992-c6787c49c8de_180x

Making a Stitching Pony

I have needed a stitching pony for a long time now…

The two-hour stitching pony.

Like so many other undone projects, this one has been stirring around in my head for several years.  Since my efforts have been so focused on sewing leather lately, the time had come for a new and useful tool in the shop.  I’ve looked at plenty stitching horses and ponies over the years and even used a few n person so I understood the basics of what I needed and began eyeing up the scrap pile for obvious parts.

Not absolutely necessary, but it’s nice to be able to open the jaws fully.

I decided to keep the project simple, small, and portable while making as few purchases as possible.  I was able to gather up the lumber, leather, hinge, screws, glue, and tacks in just a few minutes and get to work.  Power tools make jobs like this easy so the boards were quickly ripped, cut, and clamped up to dry overnight.  A little cleanup in the morning yielded a working model suggesting a few minor changes.  The opening of the throat was widened by 1/2″and I decided a longer bolt would be useful for fat projects.

This meant a trip to the actual hardware store setting the project bill up to $1.07 with a total work time of about two hours.  We’re good to go…