Gymnacyclidium

That’s quite a velocipede indeed!

Gymnacyclidium

Gymnacyclidium – This sounds like something for which you could be administered a shot to clear it up.  I thought these monstrosities worth looking at for the danger factor if nothing else.  Let’s hope the young lady is wearing adequate undergarments as it seems certain she will be taking a spill or two in the very near future.  I do like the curly cue fender thingy on the front though.

A bit of history about the bicycle: Invented more-or-less as we know it around 1817 with various propulsion systems added from about 1839 through the 1860s when bikes became more like what we know today.  A major step forward occurred in 1888 when Dunlop developed the pneumatic tire, making cycling more comfortable and practical.

The Rover Safety Bicycle 1886.

The Bicycle Machines of Guatamala

I wrote a little something about this a while back; see the post about the BicimáquinasMatt, from Makeshift sent me this link and asked me to share it.  Have a look.  It is pretty inspiring to see Makers of this caliber.

From their YouTube page:

“Power Hackers, a series made in collaboration with Autodesk, profiles unexpected makers and designers who are developing creative climate solutions.

This video profiles the inspiring work of Maya Pedal, a Guatemalan organization that produces “bicimaquinas,” or bicycle-powered machines. The income-generating devices range from blenders to milling machines. Along with clever engineering, director Mario Juarez has succeeded in fostering pride in the community’s work.

Makeshift is a field guide to hidden creativity. Subscribe to our YouTube channel to follow original series like Power Hackers.”

While you’re at it, have a look at their quarterly magazine at http://mkshft.org.

Camper Bicycle

I would love a human-powered world with creatures like this filling our highways, quietly and without belching exhaust into the air.  Maybe we wouldn’t need to expend all our resources and youth expanding the empire to secure our ever-growing need for oil overseas.

bikecamperAs things stand today, there are few roads you could safely travel with this beast. But I’m just a dreamer.  Is that window a subtle Oregon “O”?

Found here: http://mooiefietsennicebikes.tumblr.com/post/87924151197/camperbike

Bicycle Powered Micro Vardo

A very interesting vardo build by artist Barry Howard.  He created a guest post on Tiny House Talk earlier this summer to discuss his ultra-light, fold-down, micro vardo to tow behind his bike.  It provides about 12 square feet (1.1 square meters) which is about the minimum needed for an average size human or two to sleep.  As an artist, he uses it for carrying art supplies, transporting his finished paintings, and as a bedroom.  With a fold down table inside, it provides a place out of the weather and a table outside to cook on.

bikevardo0

I’ll bet he gets even more gawkers than us gas powered travelers.

bikevardo1

Note the standard mounted bottle opener.  No self respecting vardo traveler is without one.

bikevardo2

Great details in the paint, and even a stained glass window.  I wish I had these skills myself.

bikevardo3I love the mini mollycroft.  It gives it a very classy look.

foldingCreating a folding box like this adds a real degree of difficulty, especially while keeping it lightweight.  He seems to have manged it beautifully.

folded

Folded, it presents a low profile for less wind resistance and a low center of gravity.

Visit Barry Howard’s Facebook page for more photos or check out his blog to see what  he’s up to with his very cool vardo.

selfBH

Click the self portrait
to visit the Aimlessly Wandering Artist’s blog.