Frame saws

The frame saw.  Virtually every house in North America contained one of these prior to oil and gas heat.

The frame saw. Virtually every house in North America contained one of these prior to oil and gas heat.

Advertisement from 1913.

These saws are an excellent and handy way to cross-cut large logs quickly.  the design is over 2,500 years old solving the problem of keeping a stiff blade with a minimum amount of metal.  This style come in at about 4 1/2 pounds giving enough heft to aid in cutting.  Teeth cut both ways and the blades tend to be made from excellent steel.  Perfect for re-use if you can find one mouldering in the corner of a flea market.  I picked on up several years ago in “like new” condition and it has given great service ever since.  Limbs can be simply replaced if they become rotted or otherwise damaged.  These are the chainsaws of our forebears.

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About George Crawford

archaeologist, archer, primitive technologist, and wannabee musician ... mostly
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2 Responses to Frame saws

  1. Gordon Lo says:

    I never cease to be surprised when finding an old tool or piece of furniture that you think is old an antiquated to be something I used on a daily basis not too many decades ago. We called the saw , not a frame saw, but a “buck saw”. I have no way of knowing why we called it that, just that my dad did. He would have been 116 this coming month.

    • Yes, the big one’s are “bucksaws” in American lingo. Bucksaws are mostly for firewood and used on a “sawbuck.” An old play on words I believe. I used “frame saw” as it covers the whole family of bow saws, coping saws, old time ripsaws, etc.

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