Showing Off His Willy(s)

willys

Click for a full-size image.

This remarkable vehicle hit the market in a big way after the war.  I would love to own one of these classics. I might even be willing to trade in the Vespa for one.

Gymnacyclidium

That’s quite a velocipede indeed!

Gymnacyclidium

Gymnacyclidium – This sounds like something for which you could be administered a shot to clear it up.  I thought these monstrosities worth looking at for the danger factor if nothing else.  Let’s hope the young lady is wearing adequate undergarments as it seems certain she will be taking a spill or two in the very near future.  I do like the curly cue fender thingy on the front though.

A bit of history about the bicycle: Invented more-or-less as we know it around 1817 with various propulsion systems added from about 1839 through the 1860s when bikes became more like what we know today.  A major step forward occurred in 1888 when Dunlop developed the pneumatic tire, making cycling more comfortable and practical.

The Rover Safety Bicycle 1886.

Another Early Bicycle

“Any Boy can learn himself to ride in a few hours…”

I am a fan of cycling and have a special place in my heart for the old contraptions from the early days.  Based on the enormous price, the one pictured below must have been a rich kid’s toy.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics $25 in 1869 is the equivalent of $432 today.

However, this model was a truly cutting-edge machine as it has pedals.  Pedals were added to the coasting “balance bicycle” in the 1860s taking this otherwise limited toy into the realm of a true form of transportation.  It’s good to note that the early “bone-shakers” were generally made of wood and were only made from metals sometime after 1870 as the technology became available.

From the March 1869 issue of Harper’s New Monthly magazine, found HERE.

Presented here are a few more gentlemen on velocipedes from an 1868 Harper’s Magazine for your viewing pleasure.

Finally, by the 1890s, bicycle sales were catering to women as well as men (and other children) and like the ad says, “Perfection Attained” in the Crescent Bicycle.

From the April 1895 issue of The Delineator.

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Table Saw 1889

Table SawA circular saw is a tool which no workman who has once seen it at work would care to be without, for it is a labour-saving tool of the first importance, and enables its owner to do many things with an amount of ease, exactness, precision, and rapidity that cannot be attained with saws actuated by the hand and arm. When an amateur becomes the possessor of a lathe, one of the first things he will do is to have it fitted with a circular saw and the necessary appliances in the shape of table, fence, etc., to enable him to use it
conveniently and with due effect. The professional workman, on the other hand, although he will not be without a circular saw to be worked on and by his lathe, wants something stronger and heavier that will save him the labour of using the rip saw, which has made many a man’s arm and shoulder ache when the absence of suitable machinery in the workshop has compelled him to keep at this kind of work for many successive hours, perhaps, if not through the entire day; and every man who seeks to save time and labour, and therefore money, either for himself or for those in his employ, will, or ought to, take care to have a thoroughly efficient machine well suited to the requirements of his business in his workshop.

From: “Our Guide to Good Things,” in Work– March 30, 1889

Tool Cabinet Extrordinaire

Melhuish1889

Melhuish & Sons advertisement from 1889.

Turning saw, rasp, mechanic’s saw, panel saw, chisels, brace and bits, scratch awl, pliers, screwdrivers, dividers, bevel gauge, square, spokeshave, calipers, marking gauge, plane, vice, and workbench; all in a fancy tool chest.  Wow.