Thoughts on Labor – 1854

"The aim of the laborer should be, not to get his living, to get "a good job," but to perform well a certain work; and, even in a pecuniary sense, it would be economy for a town to pay its laborers so well that they would not feel that they were working for low ends, … Continue reading Thoughts on Labor – 1854

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No Apology Necessary

As we head into the weekend, I wanted to share a short essay.  This may be a lengthy read by internet standards but I would like to suggest that you pour yourself your favorite beverage or if you are at work then skive off a bit and take in the wisdom of Robert Louis Stevenson. … Continue reading No Apology Necessary

J L Hammond, a working history

An excellent post from Michael Langford (michaellangforddotorg). I have come across this somewhere before, I think through Tom Hodgkinson’s Idler essays. Anyway, another important, but nearly lost, part of our history and how we surrender so willingly to authority.

VLtitle

michaellangforddotorg

J L Hammond and Barbara Hammond are two of the greatest historians you’ve probably never heard of.  In the early years of the twentieth century, they were commissioned by the British Labor Research Department to investigate the social and economic impacts of enclosure, displacement, and attempts to organize labor (combinations), up to the Reform Bill of 1832

Practically, their work discusses the effects of enclosure, the systematic disruption of  English village life by taking of common land by the aristocracy.  Enabled in large part by the Glorious Revolution of 1688, enclosure became an instrument of massive land theft by the titled classes, legitimized by Parliament.  Through the penal laws and the practice of transportation, plantations in the American colonies were provided with cheap labor.


The Concentration of Power , the controversial first chapter of The Village Labourer , was only printed in the first edition of the book.

“…differs from…

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Union made

Reposted: Did you know that labor unions made the following 36 things possible? 1.Weekends without work 2.All breaks at work, including your lunch breaks 3.Paid vacation 4.Family & Medical Leave Act (FMLA) 5.Sick leave 6.Social Security 7.Minimum wage 8.Civil Rights Act/Title VII - prohibits employer discrimination 9.8-hour work day 10.Overtime pay 11.Child labor laws 12.Occupational … Continue reading Union made