A Gathering Saw

Here’s another small project happening amidst all the “real work” that needs to get done during this quarantine.

24 inch frame saw made from Missouri grown walnut. The “hanged man” style flapper is a scrap of mahogany from some repurposed shelves. The sheath here is pine.

I seem to sell or occasionally give away the saws I make. I needed a new one. The last one went into the Winter Count raffle as the prizes were looking a little scant this year.

I went into the workshop without much of a specific plan but came out with this little gem. Just a matter of removing the unnecessary bits really.

Finally, the pin sheath is stained and a canvas quiver is made to cover the saw when broken down for travel. This one is from old,, heavyweight canvas salvaged from a truck tarp. It will all fit into a neat 24 inch bundle.

I want to keep this one but after inquiries rolling in, it may go into the shop (or another just like it).

Be Safe!

For your enjoyment: a Carpenter from 1589, Mendel Manuscript.

Packable Frame Saw

Coming soon to the blog; New plans for a packable frame saw.

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In the mean time, check out the link to my older post about making a frame saw from 5 years ago.

Click the image to see the previous bucksaw build.

Tools from the Last Century

I know I’ve been on a big kick of old gear and tools from the late nineteenth and early twentieth century lately but its good to see the range and availability of these essential items.  I find it interesting though, how poor the descriptions are and the arrangement of the catalog.  It’s like they just invented this whole idea…

1907Tools-1Above you can get an anvil, axe, and workbench on the same page as an Alpine climbing rope, Alpine belt, and a wrist sling (in case the Alpine rope breaks I presume).  I would really like the upper “foreign” work bench.

1907Tools-101Fretsaws, forges, and blacksmiths’ tools oh my.

1907Tools-102I know people who would give almost any left appendage for this nice selection of planes.

1907Tools-103The woodcutters’ frame saw isn’t even pictured (too common most likely) but I would be happy with a few others from this page.  In all the tools I’ve ever used or seen, I have never come across a “walking stick pruning saw.”  German invention, of course.

1907Tools-104I think I own that very same “saw set” as pictured above.  When I was given by my grandfather I was warned I’d probably do more harm than good if I didn’t know how to use it.  Of course, I was probably ten years old at the time.

1907Tools-frame sawAnd in the middle of the page, voila!  The very frame saw I plan to make this weekend, and hopefully make a good instruction set to give out or post.  Known as a turning saw, frame saw, or nowadays, a coping saw, this design goes back a couple thousand years.  Maybe this will be a nice class project for Rabbitstick this year.

Selections from the 1907 Catalog of the Army and Navy Co-operative Society Store, London.