Hide Tanning 1769

Here are some images from hide tanning workshops from Diderot's Encyclopedia, 1769 that I found interesting as a leather worker and occasional hide tanner. If you have done any hide tanning you'll recognize the tools of the trade.  Not much changes for the small-time home tanner. I suspect this is some hot and smelly work …

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Leatherworking Images from the Middle Ages

Some things never really change... While looking through my image archive I came upon some leather working illustrations dated to the early 15th century.  All but one of the images below is from the extremely informative Mendel manuscript dated 1425 created at Nuremberg, in what is now Germany. Creating leather from animal hides has been …

The Making of a Cabinetmaker – Part I

“I believe I was fitted by nature to become a woodworker, and had my father been a wagonmaker or millwright, a carpenter or cooper, I would have been taught by my father the trade that he knew. He saw that I would whittle something, for when I was even smaller and lived in the woods I would ask for his knife whenever he came home. He always demurred, saying, “You will cut your fingers,” for a woodworker’s knife is always sharp.

I would tease until he would hand it out with the remark, “Now you will cut yourself.” I invariably did, and it was generally the fore finger of my left hand. That finger is just covered with small scars of every possible shape. I was bound to whittle something. Father knew it, so he calculated to give me a trade where I could whittle away and bring in a little money thereby.”
Chris Weeks
Wood Craft – December 1905

Lost Art Press

bench_plane

I took kindly to woodworking. In fact, I was brought up in the woods until I was seven years of age. During these first seven years of my life I saw my father only occasionally, for he was a cabinetmaker by trade and worked in a smart little town about sixty miles distant from our forest farm and came home after intervals of about six weeks to remain with us but a day or two. When I was about seven years old my mother died and the remainder of the family father took with him to the town where he worked.

I went to school, but had a chance to run in and out of the shop as I pleased, and just about as the child learns to speak his mother’s language by sights and sounds long before it is sent to school, so I learned a great deal about…

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J L Hammond, a working history

An excellent post from Michael Langford (michaellangforddotorg). I have come across this somewhere before, I think through Tom Hodgkinson’s Idler essays. Anyway, another important, but nearly lost, part of our history and how we surrender so willingly to authority.

VLtitle

michaellangforddotorg

J L Hammond and Barbara Hammond are two of the greatest historians you’ve probably never heard of.  In the early years of the twentieth century, they were commissioned by the British Labor Research Department to investigate the social and economic impacts of enclosure, displacement, and attempts to organize labor (combinations), up to the Reform Bill of 1832

Practically, their work discusses the effects of enclosure, the systematic disruption of  English village life by taking of common land by the aristocracy.  Enabled in large part by the Glorious Revolution of 1688, enclosure became an instrument of massive land theft by the titled classes, legitimized by Parliament.  Through the penal laws and the practice of transportation, plantations in the American colonies were provided with cheap labor.


The Concentration of Power , the controversial first chapter of The Village Labourer , was only printed in the first edition of the book.

“…differs from…

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Tavern Interior by John S.C. Schaak 1762

Sifting The Past

Tavern Interior_John-S-C-Schaak_1762John S.C. Schaak  active 1760-1770

Video walkthrough:

Detail: tavern, chair, table, basket, food, sideboard, meat, pie, plate, knife, fork, fire, hearth, fireplace crane, cucumber, lemon sausage, meat hook, beef, bird, bird cage, bottle, glass, bread, mortar and pestle, chocolate pot, spit turner, soldier, cooking pot, tongs, serving boy, raised cooking surface, fry pan, jug, game birds, rabbit

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