Living Without Money

Not a new story, but one that seems to keep resurfacing.  Maybe there’s a crumb of wisdom that intrigues people about this concept.  Most people in the Western World have never, for a second, considered life without money, yet for most of the world, and nearly all of our history, this was the natural condition.

Can we all do it tomorrow? No. Can we move toward a less abstract, personally productive life? Yes.  Click the photo to read the short article or link below to visit the website and his book.

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Mark Boyle has a cuppa out the front of his caravan. He has forgone money and says he has found happiness.

“I believe the fact that we no longer see the direct repercussions our purchases have on the people, environment and animals they affect is the factor that unites these problems. The degrees of separation between the consumer and the consumed have increased so much that it now means we’re completely unaware of the levels of destruction and suffering embodied in the ‘stuff’ we buy.”

This is the most salient point that so many of us miss in our daily routine.

“Very few people actually want to cause suffering to others; most just don’t have any idea that they directly are. The tool that has enabled this separation is money, especially in its globalised format.”

“I am not anti anything. I am pro-nature, pro-community and pro-happiness. And that’s the thing I don’t get – if all this consumerism and environmental destruction brought happiness, it would make some sense. But all the key indicators of unhappiness – depression, crime, mental illness, obesity, suicide and so on are on the increase. More money it seems, does not equate to more happiness.”

Mark Boyle is the founder of the Freeconomy Community www.justfortheloveofit.org. The Moneyless Man, a book about his year without money, is available here and elsewhere on the web.

Craft Fetishism or A Return to Craft Values?

74 FOOTWEAR DESIGN CONSULTING

There’s been a noticeable increase in crafted products over the last 5 years.

From Artisan Bread, Chocolate and Beer to handcrafted bicycles, bags and belts. Crafts have been celebrated in books, documentaries and Design fairs. Artists like Joana Vasconcelos have adopted crafts such as crochet and lace for their chosen media, and even graffiti has taken a crafted turn with new techniques in stenciling and knit-bombing. With significant developments in progressive crafts such as digicraft, many industrial designers are also turning to craft values instead of the traditional industrial ones.

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But why is it that in today’s increasingly technological culture is there also such a strong crafts vibe?

A successful exhibition titled POWER OF MAKING  at the V&A in London recently celebrated this craft resurgence and presented some reasons for it. A few of the exhibiting artists, designers and craftspeople like Ji Yong-Ho and Demakersvan have already…

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N55 Walkinghouse

N55 is a group of artists and designers who have some interesting ideas.  I have been interested in the Walkinghouse since I first saw it.  Here is a link to its “manual” and here is a video of it walking in Copenhagen.  I selfishly wish they were doing this somewhere closer to me.  While on this website, its worth checking out some of their other ideas.  They are broken up into “manuals” and they also have a book you can download.

I like much of their design and hope to continue to see more as they progress.

My only real problem with this design is the lack of an easy-entry door.  I couldn’t imagine climbing in while holding anything (like a sack of groceries).  I do find the combination of solar-electric, hydraulic drive, and wood heat to be intriguing.

Yucca

Out with the camera and taking a few plant photos.  Here’s a couple I like.