Blast Off with this Homemade Atomic Age Rocket Camper

George Crawford:

Home-built camper fans will probably really appreciate this remarkable future-retro monstrosity. Conceived, designed, and built by Bill Guernsey while recovering from a broken back, it took two years to complete. Follow the link below to the short write-up on the Makezine Blog or click here to straight to the Instructable: http://www.instructables.com/id/Rocket-Camper-Revealed/

Originally posted on Make::

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When Alaskan resident Bill Guernsey got into a serious plane crash and broke his back and fractured seven ribs, he knew he was going to be laid up for a long, long time. But rather than let that get the best of him, he decided to use the time to finally design and then build his dream camper. And what a dream it is — a 16-foot bright red atomic age rocket camper — which ultimately took Bill two years to complete.

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Features of this sweet little 50s B-movie icon-on-wheels include portal windows, solar power, kitchen, bathroom, and power and environmental control panels complete with needle gauges, segment displays, gem lights, and toggle switches. And for as tiny as the camper is, it actually looks very liveable inside. Besides the fun and inherent awesomeness of the project itself, to build and to camp in, one can never underestimate…

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Cobbler’s Workbenches

7000910_1_lI have come across these little benches for quite some time and I find them fascinating. I even started a folder in my image library for them.  A quick search around the web finds many of these in auction houses, on Ebay, Craigslist, and elsewhere, generally at exorbitant prices.  It appears they generally end their long lives as side-tables in a middle class home, assisting in the creation of nothing; just a curiosity to a collector. cobblers-benchThey really are remarkable and interesting professional tools; clearly bespoke to the needs and means of the craftsman who used them.  You can almost see their ancestry written upon them; a Roman or Medieval bench with simple splayed legs, a cutaway for seat, a little rail to keep tools from rolling away.  Later some small tills might be created to segregate nails and needles, and knife slots added so that they might be handy but safe.Genuine-Cushman-Colonial-Creations-Cobblers-Bench-Coffee-Table-245-Dealer-5534Really, a simple slab of wood, but as “needs must” it becomes a little workshop, self-contained.

Drawers or cubbyholes became a natural addition to the workspace as the bench replaces tool caddies.  Some can be locked up for safe-keeping and fancy builders made more comfortable seats.

shakercobbler2The essential layout seems to always be the same.  We are, after all, given the same basic human shape and the need is the same.  Organization, convenience, and a solid place to work.cobblerI can see this type bench being useful for other crafts as well but it would definitely end up modified over time to suit the specifics.CBENCHEven the above humble specimen has found a home, holding more collected crafts.  Slowly dying as a curio for some of us to ponder as a useful holdover from an era when we made for ourselves.CLbenchThe designs seem varied as the places they originate and the ingenuity of the makers.  Cordwainers, cobblers, leather bag makers, can all find the beauty in this design.primitivecobblerMany a zapatero could still find great assistance with a shop setup like this.earlycobblerI could make great use of this as an itinerant craftsman.  And maybe I shall someday.
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Perhaps, by looking into the past, we are seeing a better, simpler future

Cobbler at work, no citation, no date. Click for "source".

Cobbler at work, no citation, no date. Click for “source”.

“Round and ’round the cobbler’s bench, the monkey chased the weasel…”

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Tool Caddy

From Affine Creations:

“Rooted in my love of Mathematics and geometric simplicity, I create visually strikingly pieces of wood art that are also household items.”

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3Beautiful work.  I love the detail in the finger joints.  You can find more of his excellent work here: Affine Creations.  Here are a few of his other projects.

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Cobblers

George Crawford:

A reblog from the Northwest Woodworking Studio.

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Originally posted on Shavings:

Cobblers
This letter was sent to me by an old friend.

Hi, Gary!

May I give you a story, as promised?

The story is told that if you were a young person in medieval France embarking on a spiritual quest, if you were fortunate you might meet up with someone older, perhaps a teacher, who would say this to you: I think I understand what you are seeking. Let me give you the name of someone I know, a cobbler, in Dijon. I think that it might work out well if you were to become his apprentice. If that happens, let me give you one piece of advice. Don’t talk with him about spiritual matters; just let him teach you how to make shoes.

So, time passes, and you find yourself in Dijon, and you seek out the cobbler. Sure enough, as it works out, you become his apprentice.

Years…

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Documenting a Foot-Powered Treadle Lathe

From the YouTube channel, Chop With Chris where he does “amazing woodworking projects with no power tools.”  At last count, he has 19 “how to” videos available and a slew of other good things on his YouTube channel.

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From his “About” Page:

“I play in that weird intersection of woodworking and music! A few years ago I randomly picked up this woodworking hobby that started with a few cheap flea market tools and a wooden stump. Driven by inspiration and passion to try bigger and better projects, this “hobby” has turned into an obsession with wood, tools, and video editing. Join me for the excitement, the entertainment, and the eduction on my next woodworking adventure. Come on and Chop With Chris!

Learn and enjoy!

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Simple Type of Indian Home Cot

Originally posted on Lost Art Press:

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ONE of our Indian readers sends us particulars for the making of a simple home cot, which we think will be of general interest.

The cot consists of a skeleton framework supported by four legs, the overall height being 18 ins. The length of the cot is 5 ft. 6 ins., the width 3 ft. 6 ins. The mattress is made by weaving a good strong tape mesh as suggested in the top right corner of the plan drawing. The method of jointing the side and end rails of the cot to the legs is somewhat unusual and, if the maker is not familiar with the joint, he is advised to make a rough model of one corner before proceeding with his work. Fig. 1 shows a plan of the cot as seen from above. Fig. 2 is the front elevation, showing on the right a turned leg as suggested…

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More on the Dovetail Theme

dovetailGraham Haydon of the Joiner’s Workbench shows a fun experiment while showing off his new dovetail saw from Skelton Saws.  Graham joins a couple 1 x 6’s in three minutes and does a pretty good job of it.  This is what I imagine some apprentice doing back in the pre-industrial era when he’s showing off his newly mastered skills to the master or a shop rival.  There is no real point for the speed other than to demonstrate how little time and effort is really necessary to form a traditional wood joint.  This is definitely upping my interest in perfecting traditional joinery.

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